Miscellany

Tim Page reviews — or ponders — the largest boxed set of CDs ever produced (all conducted by Herbert von Karajan)….

Soprano Nina Stemme is awarded the Birgit Nilsson Prize and lots of money….

Anne Akiko Meyers, who visits Pacific Symphony in June, talks about playing the world’s most expensive violin….

Acclaimed composer Charles Wuorinen gives a really cranky interview to The New York Times….

Police were called in Ohio after a man playing bassoon was thought to have a gun….

A celebrated American film director will make his debut directing opera at La Scala next season….

A new classical music talent show may be on television soon and Plácido Domingo might be a judge….

Books on classical music: Some essentials (2)

Having a few books of music criticism — the right ones, at least — is an essential part of any serious classical music lover’s library. Good music criticism teaches us how to listen to and think about music.

A great book to start with is Tim Page on Music by none other than my friend Tim Page.

It’s a terrific volume for many reasons, but one of them that I’m always struck by is his prose style. It is conversational in the best sense, but not “breezy” in the way that most people mean when they say “conversational.” No, Tim’s prose has a real warmth, grace and flow. You can read it out loud and it sounds well (probably because Tim does that himself before he publishes a piece). It addresses the reader as if he is as intelligent as Tim, and just as interested in the subject matter.

Sometimes considered a critical no-no, the first person pronoun is used by Tim in a masterly way. He makes its use thoroughly convincing because somehow he talks directly and intimately to the reader and the use of the “I” becomes modest rather than boastful.

Along with Martin Bernheimer and Justin Davidson, he is one of only three living music critics to have won the Pulitzer Prize.

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