Bernstein’s ‘On the Town’: ‘Ya Got Me’

If your only knowledge of Leonard Bernstein’s musical “On the Town” is the famous movie, then you don’t know it. The film cut most of Bernstein’s music and the composer ended up boycotting it.

Here’s a great bit from the studio cast recording made in 1960 under Bernstein’s direction, and not in the movie. There are two quick comedic preludes and then the wonderful song “Ya Got Me.” The characters are attempting to cheer up their friend, Gabey.

Pacific Symphony: August concerts

Pops conductor Richard Kaufman returns to the podium this month to conduct the orchestra in a live-to-picture performance of John Williams’ score to Steven Spielberg’s “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial” on Aug. 18 at the Pacific Amphitheater. Williams won the Oscar for “Best Original Score” for his music to the Spielberg classic, which will be projected in high definition on a giant screen above the orchestra. Tickets here

On Aug. 12, artistic partner Pacific Chorale holds its annual choral festival concert in Segerstrom Concert Hall. Artistic director Robert Istad leads community singers, the Chorale and guest artists in performances of music by Mozart: the “Vesperae solennes de confessor,” K.339; the  “Alleluia” from “Exsultate, jubilate,” K.165; “Ave verum corpus,” K.618; and an excerpt from the Organ Fantasia in F minor, K.608. Tickets are free but reservations are required 

photo: ™ & © Universal Studios.

Miscellany

The Boston Symphony’s top flutist sues orchestra for not paying her as much as a male colleague. …

Edward Elgar

More than year after sustaining a hand injury, Lang Lang returns to the concert stage. …

The brilliant British composer Oliver Knussen is dead at 66. …

The Mozart Effect may be back, this time reducing epileptic activity in children. …

In case you missed it, here’s the building that’s going up next to Segerstrom Concert Hall. …

A woman who brought an Elgar manuscript to the Antiques Roadshow is threatened with legal action. …

“From the Top” lays off its longtime host Christopher O’Riley. …

A Washington Post investigation uncovers more #MeToo incidents in the world of classical music. …

Four years after nearly going under, San Diego Opera is stable and growing. …

The music in his favorite restaurant was terrible, so a famous composer took it over. …

 

GSOplay at the Gothenburg Symphony

GSOplay is the Gothenburg Symphony’s online series of high definition performance videos. “We release approximately two to three videos per month and normally the performances are available for viewing up to 30 days after the release date,” the website says. Currently, the page features a nice range of repertoire, including the Symphony No. 5 by Sibelius, the “Symphonie fantastique” by Berlioz and the Piano Concerto No. 2 by Stenhammer.

Above, Kent Nagano conducts the orchestra in Mahler’s Symphony No. 3.

Anton Urspruch: Symphony in E-flat (1882)

Anton Urspruch (1850-1907), a name new to me, was a German composer, pedagogue and pianist who studied with Lachner, Raff and Liszt. He was said to be one of the latter’s favorite pupils. He composed many works, but, like Franck and Chausson, only one symphony. The piece is Brahmsian, but lighter and brighter, all to the good. It strikes me, after brief acquaintance, as very worthy of revival.

Marcus Bosch conducts the Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie. I have posted the movements separately for easier sampling.

To hear other music in this series, click on the “neglected symphonies” tag at the bottom of this post.

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Emilie Mayer: Symphony No. 7 in F minor (1856)

Emilie Mayer (1812-1883) was a German composer, quite successful in her day. Among her compositions are 8 symphonies, a piano concerto, several concert overtures and much chamber music. Her most famous teacher was Carl Loewe, remembered today mostly for his lieder.

Her Symphony No. 7 is impressive and very Schumannesque.

To hear more music in this series, click on the “neglected symphonies” tag below this post.

A visit to Pacific Symphony’s music library

You go in the artists’ entrance at Segerstrom Concert Hall, walk past the security guard behind the window (once you get the OK), enter the first door on the right and head down two flights of stairs. You’re in the basement now, walking down a long concrete hallway in low light when, on the right, you come upon this plaque.

It’s the library of Pacific Symphony. Step inside and it’s a cozy and quiet little place.

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